Chasing Baja – The Honda Ridgeline Chase Truck Part 2

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So, how did the shoot turn out while I had the Honda Ridgeline Chase Truck? Check out the video here!

Sometimes video shoots go exactly as planned with no issues or anything to worry with. Other times, it doesn’t quite work out that way. Even with this video on the 2017 Honda Ridgeline Black Edition turned Chase Truck, it wasn’t all one take on one day. It’s one of those shoots that you had to live, learn, and just adapt.

The Video

The Backstory


As I mentioned in Part 1, I didn’t even really expect to be able to shoot this truck. New media and all that. So, I was genuinely excited to get the chance to use and drive it. First few days was just getting to know the truck, drive it around and feel out its quirks and strengths. Then I made my first trip out towards Barstow, CA. Everything was going extremely well and was shooting to make my way to Stoddard Wells OHV. I was making decent time and it was going to be a good shoot and then “BANG.”

Worried, I pulled over and looked the truck over. Tires were fine, there were no marks on the body. Then I looked over at the windshield and noticed Nickle sized marks in the windshield, just to the passenger side of the radar for the lane assist. I don’t know if it was two rocks or something bolo’ed together, but man it scared the hell out of me driving at 70-MPH down the I-15. Since it wasn’t a crash or anything critical, the company who handle’s Honda’s press fleet said they would handle it when I returned it a few days later.

Re-shoots


Since that put me back a little bit, I was worried that my video shots wouldn’t look all the great. So, when I got to Stoddard Wells, I did still photography first. I got photos of the truck that you saw in the first article and when I was happy, transitioned to doing video. So, when I got back it didn’t come out as good as I had hoped as they were a little too dark. I already had plans to shoot out at Hungry Valley the next day, so I wasn’t worried, at first.

Of course, when I planned this, fires weren’t an issue. Then the Thomas Fire became the largest California Wildfire on record. Many of the embers from that blaze spread out and sparked other fires in the area, including the Rey Fire around Castaic Junction. Fortunately, the Hungry Valley OHV wasn’t touched but it did hurt my travel time. What’s normally an hour drive became a three-and-a-half and I got to Hungry far later than I had anticipated. It wasn’t all a disaster as it did give me some decent dirt road shots I used in the video. Trust me, I’m not complaining from my plans being ruined from what was and still is a huge disaster. Many families lost their homes, Christmas, and much more when it occurred. They are still dealing with it now with mudslides from the burned ground rains in the area.

Final Shoot


So, on the final day I went and made the best of it. I went back to Stoddard Wells OHV before sunrise. I got a couple of long shutter shots of the truck and got a time lapse video of the sun coming up. Once there was enough light, I climbed up that foothill to get shots of the truck and the outlet center in Barstow in the background. Once I finished up shooting stills and video, I made the trek from there all the way down to the Long Beach Shoreline Marina in Long Beach, CA to do final shots for the video.

So, the tale isn’t terribly harrowing as it could have been, but it was a lesson to be learned regardless. To plan just a little better and give myself a little more time for shooting is something that will continue to stay with me. However, you can never plan on everything and I have been involved in worse shoots. The main thing is just being ready to adapt for whatever may come and never panic. At least have a contingency in your head ready to go at a moment’s notice should something happen. Otherwise, just get out and shoot.

The Patreon Giveaway


There will be some exciting stuff coming for coverage of the King of the Hammers, but after hearing the announcement of the Triple Crown of Off-Road, Carbage needs to get out to all three of those rounds. However, we need your help and we’re going to reward you. We’re going to be giving away six tickets to the 2018 King of the Hammers to random fans who support us on Patreon. If we hit $1500 per month or more, we will also give away six spectator tickets to each of the three rounds of the Nitto Tires Triple Crown of Off-Road.

You’ll have to provide your own travel and accommodations for all those events, but you’ll be getting a chance to win a ticket that’s worth up $30 for the KOH, a $35 parking pass for the Mint 400, and a $50 weekend pass for Crandon during Labor Day Weekend. All you need to do is support us at Patreon.com/carbage for as little as a $1 per month. Again, you’ll have to make your way there and figure out your stay but those are tickets you won’t have to buy if you’re chosen at random from our Patreon supporters. There will be only one ticket per random winner. NOTE: Ultra4, Best In The Desert, The Mint 400, Crandon International Off-Road Raceway, and all of their affiliates are not associated with this giveaway.

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Justin Banner
@jb27tt on Instagram or RacerBanner on Facebook and Twitter

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Justin Banner

The Talent Behind the Camera – Justin Banner Since 2007, Justin Banner, Lead Editor and Owner of Carbage, has been involved with the automotive media in many capacities. From podcaster, to writer, to videographer, to announcer – he has done many forms of automotive entertainment and is why he should be your expert in content creation. He is viewed by many as an industry voice and works for the top online publications of modern media and include Speedhunters, MotoIQ, Super Street Online, and many others. Justin has also been involved in the automotive industry since he came to the working age of sixteen years old. Since that time, he has worked as a mechanic, service writer, and salesman in automotive parts. This means that not only can he relate to your audience at any skill level, he also knows what you’re looking for to generate lifetime customers and sales. Justin is also a Journalist Level member of the Motor Press Guild, an industry recognized entity of professional automotive journalists, since 2015. To be at this level, one must not only be invited by another member but also have sourced material as proof of working experience in the field.

3 thoughts on “Chasing Baja – The Honda Ridgeline Chase Truck Part 2

    1. No problem. I honestly should have put it out sooner, but I knew I was going to do a month of off-road coverage and wanted to save a post about it for the site. Also, I appreciate your support and, if you can, please donate on Patreon, too. I’m looking to get $1/month from everyone who reads and enjoys my stories and videos. However, when I write or do a video, it does take my time away from my everyday job as a freelance creator for other sites like Speedhunters, Super Street, Car Craft and the many, many others I do work for. That’s why I need your support through http://www.patreon.com/carbage, I want to get to the point where this not only supports me financially but others, too.

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